Long Exposure Photography…… Without Filters!




When shooting long exposures in the daytime you need a filter, right? Mwahahahahah!!!…………….Nope.

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Filmed on location at Tasman Lake in Aoraki Mount Cook National Park in New Zealand.

Joshua Cripps is a full-time landscape photographer living near Yosemite National Park in California. His recent work includes the worldwide marketing campaign for the Nikon D750 camera.

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All photos, text, and video are copyright Joshua Cripps. Any use without my express written permission is really not cool, man.

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Comments 31

  1. What a cool technique/feature, indeed! I like the clear, uncluttered presentation of your video, too. . I personally dislike using filters (extra glass, expensive and fiddly)… I don't know how I managed to overlook such a useful camera feature and technique before I saw this! Thank you for this fun video; I just subscribed.

  2. Hi Josh does this also work with multiple exposure mode for sony a6000? Also as far as the settings are concerned are they the same? I had to download the Multiple exposure app on the camera . Thanks.

  3. It is true that you can use that tip in the daytime, but for the night-time— if , say, you only have an 8 second exposure limit, 3 shots wouldn't be necessarily that helpful because it wouldn't compensate for the 24 seconds of light

  4. Hi Joshua, Rest all are fine but why shooting in Continuos mode? Wouldn't it create a series of images shot one after another. But our aim is to create a single image with average of all multi exposure images. Is setting it to continuos mode is necessary?

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