Photography tips – How to shoot amazing panoramic landscapes




Practical Photography’s Tim Berry heads to the rugged Peak District countryside to bring you a complete beginner’s guide to shooting glorious panoramic landscapes.

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Comments 21

  1. puzzled on the level says cost ten pound. you need it stop shopping at the shop you bought it at they are ripping you off. look on ebay or amazon they have them for a pound and that for either the circle and bubble or the 2 axes version.

  2. An ok video, but not really thorough enough…

    1- Take the strap off your camera, or you run the risk of camera shake (or even blowing over in the wind).
    2- Use an L-bracket (as pointed out below).
    3- Use a shutter release cable (or a remote release). Quicker and more efficient than using the self-timer.
    4- Where's your focal point? Manual focus? Personally, I use back-button focusing.
    5- Are you bracketing your shots to balance the sky and foreground (as you're not using ND filters), or are you compromising quality by relying on software, to bring out detail??
    6- Always pan from left to right…your chosen editing software will thank you for it!
    7- Demonstrate how you set your exposure…this video is clearly aimed at the beginner.
    8- When hiking in changeable weather, never wear jeans. If you get caught in the rain and your jeans get wet, they will stay wet, cold and uncomfortable! Wear walking trousers…that's what they're made for!

    Tim, you and the magazine are (supposed to be) professionals. When doing a "how to…" video, please think through the details…and ask youselves the questions a beginner might ask. Making panoramas is a wonderful way of fully capturing a scene (and I really enjoy making them!). A more comprehensive video might encourage more people to try it out.

    Rant over…

  3. Well done for mentioning using manual White Balance – a lot of tutorials miss that. On the other hand, while you mentioned "Manual Mode", you didn't mention Manual Focus – a vital setting or each shot will try to focus for itself and probably (almost definitely) focus at different distances.

  4. While I agree that for the perfect pano shot you need to use the tripod and go through the whole levelling process, I've managed to take many successful panos that I'm quite happy with without one. e.g. this one of Eilean Donan Castle. https://flic.kr/p/StbR2a

    (Granted, I'm not a professional photographer and don't plan to sell my images. I would probably take more time and do it properly if I was planning on selling my photos!)

  5. Great tutorial. Thank you for your time and effort. How about a multiple row HDR panoramic? That should be fun…for you…for us viewers and for the software you will use to stitch them…?

  6. Top tip about the white balance. Thanks.
    Also, I always take an obviously blank/wrong shot (eg hand in front of lens) immediately before and after the panoramic shots so that when you open them in Lightroom you can more easily spot the panoramic group. This is especially useful if you are out all day taking different kinds of shots of the same sort of scenery.

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