Composition in Photography




http://theartofphotography.tv/episodes/episode-18-composition/

Composition part two – an extension of Episode 5 :: Rule of Thirds. Today we’ll look at application of the golden section in composition and explore some of the work of Henri Cartier-Bresson.

View more at http://aop.thepublicbroadcast.com

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Comments 21

  1. great video as per usual, but i have to say i think hcb at his best isn't the image of the cardinal, i feel after years of studying his work, it is the images that are more open and giving space and distance are the images that define his eye, for example the last image you discussed (the cyclist). How ever the most powerful image of hcb for me is the image in mexico of the the man holding his arms to his chest, his head out of the image and the high heel shoes on the right making the shape of a heart, powerful and mysterious and at odds with much of his other work. Id like to suggest a compostion video on koudelka the images from exiles in particular, Great channel ted, makes me think the internet community isn't such a bad place for those who love photographs and want to learn more about them. Keep it up.

  2. Reminds me of the high school english lit teacher who talks on and on for weeks about what the author really meant. When people finally meet the author and ask about what that teacher said, there is usually a laugh involved. You can either make photographs, or you can draw circles and triangles on other people's photographs. You can't do both.

  3. I think there are cases when the viewer of a photograph can see certain rules on display in the shot, but at the time the photographer may not even be thinking about rules or deciding what he should put where,The photographer may well have just pointed the camera and released the shutter within a split second of aiming.I think it's false to believe that some of the rules we know about composition were adhered to at the moment some shots were taken.

  4. at one time Bresson used a leica which gave an upside down image in the viewfinder, supposed to allow disengagement from the subject matter and focus on form.

  5. The Decisive Moment is not when Cartier-Bresson hit the shutter, big misconception, its actually when he selected the image from his contact sheet. If you actually look at his contacts he tended to photograph the same scene over and over again until something 'worthy' happened. Read a book.

  6. The Decisive Moment is not when Cartier-Bresson hit the shutter, big misconception, its actually when he selected the image from his contact sheet. If you actually look at his contacts he tended to photograph the same scene over and over again until something 'worthy' happened. Read a book.

  7. Very nice video, Ted. I'm working my way through your series. As a beginner, it's very nice to take a break from the technical details and focus on what makes really great shots great. Thank you for walking us through one of your favorite masters.

  8. Don't just look at photographic resources for information on composition! Painting covers much of the same ground and unlike the relatively "new" medium of photography, in painting there are a few centuries' worth of analysis on the subject. Beauty is beauty, whether it's on canvas or a JPEG.

  9. HCB was a kranky old git who thought that photography was only second rate after "Art". he neither developed his own film nor printed his own images. He stated quite firmly that you should never crop your images but his famous out of focus image "The Puddle Hopper" is heavily cropped. It was o.k. from him to do it but not you. Phillip Jones Griffith said that this shot was the best photograph ever taken, rubbish. Erwitt, Cappa,Salgado, McCullen, Frank, Maier are way ahead. Loved the video,MGB

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